Get the S.S. Keewatin Newsletter: it’s FREE!

Subscribe


Better Yet, Support Our Cause!
Join the Keewatin Preservation Society: $50.00/yr.

Annual Membership Includes:

  • Season Pass to S.S. Keewatin for one Adult, plus half price for a Season Pass for a second Adult (if purchased at the same time):
  • 25% Guest Admission Discount for every Adult Guest you bring to the ship. (Children under 16 are admitted FREE with an accompanying Adult.)
  • 10% Gift Shop Merchandise Discount, access to items available only to Volunteers and Members, and Advance Notice of special events.
  • The Upper Great Lakes Fleet Newsletter, with insider information on the evolution of our Online Museum (plus the S.S. Keewatin newsletter).

Join

 

And, be sure to Follow Us on Facebook.

Comments Box SVG iconsUsed for the like, share, comment, and reaction icons

1 day ago

S.S. Keewatin

Midland’s Shipbuilding Heritage

Shipbuilding in Midland started in 1910 under the leadership of lumber industry executive, James Playfair. Construction took place during the first five years by Midland Dry Dock of three tugs, two scows and the reconstruction of a Great Lakes freighter.

After the shipyard went quiet for four years, in 1919 with the construction of WAR FIEND launched in 1921 (shown), Midland Shipbuilding was very active until 1930 when the shipyard closed down during the Great Depression. With the advent of World War II, Midland Shipyards reopened helping with the construction of minesweepers and corvettes needed by England’s Royal Navy and the Royal Canadian Navy.

After the war, several tugs and hopper barges were built between 1945 and 1948. After the construction of four bulk carriers between 1948 and 1954, Midland Shipyards closed.

The 1920 photo shows GLENCLOVA being constructed. After four more name changes over her life of service, she was finally retired and scrapped in 1970.
Original black and white photo of the workers: Courtesy of S.S. Keewatin archives

Original black and white photos of War Fiend (pre-launch) and construction of Glenclova: Courtesy of Huronia Museum

Photo of War Fiend’s launch: Courtesy of Rene Hackstetter

Information: Courtesy of Midland Shipyards, Midland, Ontario

shipbuildinghistory.com/canadayards/midland.htm
... See MoreSee Less

Midland’s Shipbuilding Heritage

Shipbuilding in Midland started in 1910 under the leadership of lumber industry executive, James Playfair. Construction took place during the first five years by Midland Dry Dock of three tugs, two scows and the reconstruction of a Great Lakes freighter.  

After the shipyard went quiet for four years, in 1919 with the construction of WAR FIEND launched in 1921 (shown), Midland Shipbuilding was very active until 1930 when the shipyard closed down during the Great Depression. With the advent of World War II, Midland Shipyards reopened helping with the construction of minesweepers and corvettes needed by England’s Royal Navy and the Royal Canadian Navy. 

After the war, several tugs and hopper barges were built between 1945 and 1948. After the construction of four bulk carriers between 1948 and 1954, Midland Shipyards closed. 

The 1920 photo shows GLENCLOVA being constructed. After four more name changes over her life of service, she was finally retired and scrapped in 1970.
Original black and white photo of the workers: Courtesy of S.S. Keewatin archives

Original black and white photos of War Fiend (pre-launch) and construction of Glenclova: Courtesy of Huronia Museum

Photo of War Fiend’s launch: Courtesy of Rene Hackstetter

Information: Courtesy of  Midland Shipyards, Midland, Ontario

http://shipbuildinghistory.com/canadayards/midland.htm

Comment on Facebook 162133843881044_3738436886250704

My grandfather Duggan worked there!!